Computers, smartphones, and tablets are expensive enough as it is. But when you outfit them with custom designer fabrics and jewels, they can cost you a mind-blowing sum of money.

While some gadgets can run you thousands of dollars because of their luxurious build materials, others are extremely expensive because of the technology that’s inside them and what they can do.

From gold-crafted iPhones to giant tablets with stunning displays, here are some of the most ridiculously expensive gadgets.

See eight of the most ridiculously expensive gadgets money can buy.
Most people probably wouldn’t pay more than a few hundred dollars for a smartphone, let alone an accessory for your smartphone. But Jarre claims its sleek and tall iPhone companion is worth it. The sound system is said to be the result of years of research by French composer Jean Michael Jarre and his team.

The Optimus Maximus keyboard sold for $1,500 when it launched six years ago. That’s because the device’s keys are fully programmable — meaning you can assign a different function to each key. Each button on the keyboard is a miniature display that tells you what its function is at a given time. Engadget has a brief review that explains how it works.

Panasonic’s 4K Windows 8 tablet sells for $6,000, but you don’t have to worry about it breaking under stress. Since it’s a Toughpad, Panasonic’s rugged line of laptops and tablets, it can withstand being dropped from 2.5 feet. Rugged devices are usually much more expensive than regular computers since they’re equipped to meet certain standards. But the 4k Toughpad’s super-sharp 3,840×2,560-pixel-resolution display also accounts for its high price tag.

If you’re willing to shell out nearly $11K on a laptop, Ego Lifestyle’s emerald PC is available via Saks Fifth Avenue’s website. The PC claims to combine “high tech and fashion,” and features a handcrafted, interchangeable exterior made of crocodile Italian leather. The downside: It runs Windows Vista.

The Vertu Signature Touch’s high-end price is all about its design. All of Vertu’s smartphones are handmade in England, the company says. The phone’s casing is made of natural-grain alligator leather and grade five titanium alloy, which Vertu claims is 2.5 times stronger than stainless steel but is still light. The display is also made of scratch-resistant sapphire crystal.

Luxury manufacturer Luvalgio grabbed headlines a few years ago when it claimed to be making a high-end laptop falling into the $1 million price range. The company showcases its premium laptop, which appears to be encased in some sort of designer fabric, on its website. You need a password, however, to view the details. CNET previously reported in 2007 that it comes with an integrated screen cleaner, solid-state storage, and a Blu-ray player, among other features. Details about Luvalgio’s $1 million laptop remained scarce over the past few years, but it’s still interesting to contemplate what a $1 million laptop would be like.

Designer Stuart Hughes has re-created Apple’s iPad 2 and encrusted it with 12.5 carats of flawless diamonds. But that’s not what makes it so expensive. According to Hughes’ website, its the main front frame that’s crafted from one of the oldest rock in the world, the more than 75-million-year-old ammolite, that makes it worth a whopping $5 million. Not to mention the 65-million-year-old T-Rex bones that are embedded within the rock.

If you thought $5 million was expensive for an iPad, how about paying $10 million for a smartphone? That’s how much designer Stuart Hughes charges for his diamond-encrusted iPhone 5, which took nearly nine weeks to create by hand. Hughes re-created the iPhone 5’s chassis with solid gold and embedded a single deep-cut black diamond.

Kohler Numi’s $6,700 toilet is fully automated, which means you never actually have to touch the toilet with your hands. Instead you control the toilet using its touchscreen remote control. Other features include a heated seat, integrated bidet, color-changing lights, controls for music, and even a heater for your feet.

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